Categories
Classic English literature

This TMA accounts for 6 per cent of your assessment mark for the module. When yo

This TMA accounts for 6 per cent of your assessment mark for the module. When you have completed the TMA, please submit, ensuring the work arrives no later than 23 January 2023. For information on how to submit your work see the Assessment information for Arts modules.
There is a single part to TMA 03:
Write a critique of work and discussion that has been posted on your tutor group forum. This critique should be 1000 words long.
The critique should be about writing that has been posted on the forum by your fellow students. It should not be about any of your own creative writing posted on the forum, though it may touch on your writing practice and include discussion of some of your comments posted on the forum.
Guidance notes
See the guidance notes for TMA 03 in the A363 Assessment Guide. This guide is supplied as a printed booklet and is also available on the module website. You should also check the section on ‘Forum work and TMA 03’.
Put a word count at the end of your TMA. You may lose marks if you do not keep to the word count. The word count Is 1000 not 1100.

Please look at the assessment guidelines I have attached, look at TMA03.
PLEASE BE ON STAND BY AS I SEND YOU THE DISCUSSION, I AM STILL WAITING FOR THE DISCUSSIONS TO COME IN.

Categories
Classic English literature

How do writers use figurative language, foreshadowing, and symbolic objects to h

How do writers use figurative language, foreshadowing, and symbolic objects to help readers gain a deeper understanding of their stories? What is revealed through such examples as Adichie’s garden and serpent in “Tomorrow …”, Carver’s use of light and alcohol in “What We Talk About …”, Lim’s paper house in “Paper”, Sembene’s use of Noumbe’s heart medicine in “Her Three Days”, or Tan’s piano and the musical pieces in “Two Kinds”? Focus on any two stories, and feel free to use other examples.
My thesis.
The figurative language used by Lahiri in “When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine” and Langston Hughes in “Salvation” performs well to help readers understand unfamiliar objects, add color to the text, and makes complexity.
This is for my college English 102 class.

Categories
Classic English literature

Write a letter to one of the characters in “sweat” Objective: Relate to themes a

Write a letter to one of the characters in “sweat”
Objective: Relate to themes and characters in the play; synthesize and connect to the material and themes of ” Sweat” through writing and composing a letter to a character in the play.
Write a letter in real time and in first person to one of the character’s in SWEAT- relate to them from what you know of their story- ask them questions- give them advice- tell them about your life and why you related to them or why you wanted to send them a letter.
I’ve included a PDF file for the 2 ACTS of the play,
Thank you

Categories
Classic English literature

By the due date assigned, post your annotated bibliography entry for a scholarly

By the due date assigned, post your annotated bibliography entry for a scholarly article to the discussion area. By the end of the week, respond to your classmates’ posts with your feedback, questions, and suggestions.
For this assignment, find a scholarly article on your Week 4 short story (Alice Walker Everyday Use) in the SUO Library. Find a scholarly source examining the short story that was the focus of your Week 4 rough publish (Alice Walker Everyday use). Do not use popular publications, such as summaries from Masterplots or The Introduction to Literary Context, or other media that are not research oriented.
Post an annotation of your source to the discussion board. Your annotation should include:
A complete APA citation of your scholarly article
A paragraph of summary of the key points presented in your source
A paragraph explaining the source’s quality and how it is relevant to your analytical essay
Here is an example of an annotated APA entry (not an actual source):
Smith, A. (2016). Journey into the unknown. American Literature, 22(3), 4-5.
This article compares Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” and Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path,” discussing the protagonists’ journeys as a focal point. The article examines these two main characters and their different paths in life. Those paths led Young Goodman Brown and Phoenix Jackson into the forest on very different quests, but both were determined to take these journeys that were emotional, meaningful, and dangerous.
Smith’s article offered a fascinating perspective on the motives and outcomes of these two disparate characters and their life paths that led them into the unknown. I gained a better understanding of my character, Phoenix Jackson, by reading this article and contrasting her with Young Goodman Brown. There are several quotations and ideas I will be able to incorporate into my final publish.
Examples of Journals with Scholarly Articles:
Studies in Short Fiction
The Explicator
Modern Fiction Studies
Language and Literature
Critique
Modern Language Notes
Nineteenth-Century Fiction
Twentieth-Century Literature
Your replies to classmates should be at least a paragraph in length and made with an eye to expand, clarify, defend, and/or refine their thoughts. Consider asking questions to further meaningful conversation. Participation must be completed by the end of the week to earn credit.
I have attached the website for the scholarly article i would like for you to use
https://www.jstor.org/action/doBasicSearch?Query=Alice+walker+everyday+use
In Spite of It All: A Reading of Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use”
Sam Whitsitt
African American Review, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Autumn, 2000), pp. 443-459
…All: A Reading of Alice Walker’s ” Everyday Use ” Perhaps the most resonant quality of quiltmaking is the promise of creating unity amongst disparate elements, of establishing connections in the midst of fragmen- tation. (Kelley 176) Walker’s peculiar sound, the specific mode through which her deepening of self- knowledge and…

Categories
Classic English literature

Primary Reading: Catcher in the Rye. Secondary Reading: Donald M. Fiene’s articl

Primary Reading: Catcher in the Rye.
Secondary Reading: Donald M. Fiene’s article “J. D. Salinger Links to an external site.” in EBSCO. You may need to sign in. If so, use username and password I have provided. Then enter this link: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lfh&AN=103331DWT11770270000268&site=ehost-live&scope=site, Links to an external site.If you cannot access this article, you may use this one: O’Connor on Salinger. Please note that I have provided a citation in MLA format that you can copy and paste.
Critical Secondary Reading: One original professional research source. See “Notes” link above for full explanation.This must be a source found using EBSCO–not an anonymous source or an encyclopedic source. Actually use this source to provide added interpretation of one of the primary reading. Quote, summarize, and paraphrase. Respond critically to the writer’s ideas.
Supplementary reading. Notes on Research, Citation, Formatting, and Lesson Requirement. Do NOT refer to this source in your lesson.
Writing assignment (3-page minimum): Write a minimum of 1.5 pages on each of the following topics. Use all assigned sources thoroughly.
1. J. D. Salinger was in the first wave of soldiers landing on Normandy Beach in WWII; and though not a combat soldier, he lived through some of the bloodiest and deadliest fighting in the European Theater. He spent time in the hospital after the war with what we would today call PTSD–a condition from which he seems to have suffered for the rest of his life. He carried Holden Caulfield with him everywhere he went, working even in foxholes on the manuscriipt that would become The Catcher in the Rye. Biographers Shields and Salerno argue that this novel was actually the war novel Salinger said no one would ever be honest enough to write. Apparently, they saw the 16-year-old Caulfield as someone suffering from a kind PTSD, perhaps exposed to too much of some poisonous aspect of life. Write about two specific incidents that you believe have somehow wounded Caulfield, and explore how these incidents have shaped Caulfield’s character.
2. The title comes from Holden’s idea that he is in a field of rye where there are multitudes of playing children who are in danger of falling off the cliff and he, wearing his catcher’s mitt, is the only person capable of saving them. Write about at least two specific characters that Holden feels a need to save, making an assertion about what you think lies at the base of this impulse.

Categories
Classic English literature

This is my friends paper. She wrote out the instructions but let me know if you

This is my friends paper. She wrote out the instructions but let me know if you have any questions ! She wants you to revise/edit her paper and write out one paragragh

Categories
Classic English literature

By the due date assigned, post your response of at least 150-200 words to the Di

By the due date assigned, post your response of at least 150-200 words to the Discussion Area. By the end of the week, comment on at least two of your classmates’ submissions.
IMPORTANT NOTE: You must choose one of the stories below to work from for your Week 4 & Week 5 assignments in order to receive credit. Links to the stories can be found in my Week 4 Discussion pinned post or on the syllabus under Week 4.
Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”
Kincaid’s “Girl”
O’Connor’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find”
Updike’s “A&P”
Walker’s “Everyday Use”
Prompt:
Select one of the stories assigned by your instructor, and develop a one- or two-paragraph response to the following:
Identify one of the main themes used in the story. Explain the message the author is conveying by telling the story in this way.
Provide at least one specific example and at least one quotation from the story to illustrate your point.
Discuss how this message affects your reading and interpretation of the story. Is the story more effective or powerful because this theme is included?
Theme refers to the underlying messages or major ideas presented in the story. The author presents some belief about life by telling the story in a certain way. You, as the reader, can interpret what message you received from reading the story, but you must be able to offer evidence to support your viewpoint by sharing examples and quotations from the story.
Tips
Remember to provide evidence for your claims in the form of quoted passages from the story. Quotations, paraphrases, and summaries should be cited according to APA rules of style, including in-text and reference citations. Quoted material should not exceed 25% of the document.
Check grammar and spelling before posting.
Your replies to classmates should be at least a paragraph in length and made with an eye to expand, clarify, defend, and/or refine their thoughts. Consider asking questions to further meaningful conversation. Participation must be completed by the end of the week to earn credit.
Post directly to the discussion; do not attach a document.
Example APA Reference

Categories
Classic English literature

Reading assignment: Primary Reading: The Old Man and the Sea (entire book). Seco

Reading assignment:
Primary Reading: The Old Man and the Sea (entire book).
Secondary Reading: Hemingway introduction Links to an external site..
Critical Secondary Reading: One original professional research source. This must be a source found using EBSCO–not an anonymous source or an encyclopedic source. Actually use this source to provide added interpretation of one of the primary readings. Quote, summarize, and paraphrase. Respond critically to the writer’s ideas.
Supplementary reading. Notes on Research, Citation, Formatting, and Lesson Requirements. Do NOT refer to this source in your lesson.
Writing assignment (2 page minimum:)
This is a discussion-board assignment, meaning that you’ll post your analysis of Old Man and the Sea to the board and then respond to your peers. See detailed instructions below.
Choose ONE of the following six prompts:
1. Write about the relationship between the old man and the boy. What binds them? What separates them? Are they like family? How or how not? How does the relationship change, complicate, or deepen in the course of the novel? Point to at least five different scenes from across the novel that can help illustrate the nature of their relationship.
2. Write an essay about two of the “escapes” in the old man’s life: the lions about which he dreams and the baseball which he discusses with the boy. What role do they serve in the story? What do these two things tell us about the old man’s character? How do they relate to his actual experience fishing on the boat? How and why are they significant? Point to specific textual evidence to make your case about how and why these two elements are significant.
3. Write about the fishing itself. Why does Hemingway spend so much time describing the physical details of the fishing—from the line, to the bait, to the fish in the water? What do you make of the times in the novel that Santiago talks to the fish? Are the fish symbolic of something greater, are they simply fish, or are they both? Be sure to spend time thinking specifically about the big fish that the old man reels in at the near the end of the novel.
4. Examine the relationship between humankind and nature in “The Old Man and the Sea.” To do this, think about how the characters in the book interact with the elements—the sea and the sky and weather—as well as how they interact with the animal life, like fish and sharks and dolphins and turtles and birds. Is the view that emerges of the relationship between man and nature positive, negative, or somewhere in between? Point to at least five different interactions that illustrate the relationship between humankind and nature.
5. Do a character study of the old man. What are his physical characteristics? What’s his attitude like? How would you describe his economic situation? If you were to describe his philosophy of life, what would it be? Pick at least five scenes throughout the book that in some way illustrate his character. Finally, imagine him in a modern, American job—something other than fishing. What profession might he be in, and what kind of worker do you think he’d be?
6. Much of the book takes place on Santiago’s boat—but the opening pages and the closing pages are set, instead, on the shore. What happens during these bookends? How does the opening chapter establish a world that allows us to make sense of the fishing scenes, and how does the closing chapter cause us to re-evaluate and analyze the fishing scenes? Another way of thinking about this is to ask the question: What is the old man’s life like away from the sea? What about the boy’s life?
BONUS perhaps: Do you find any instance of epiphany in this novel? Hemingway says that his writing is like an iceberg–with only 1/8th showing on the surface. What information did you discover that was under the surface?

Categories
Classic English literature

Choose a short story from the folder and respond to it, setting your chosen stor

Choose a short story from the folder and respond to it, setting your chosen story in dialogue with the material we’ve discussed in class (time travel, robots/machines/artificial intelligence, aliens).
Do not summarize the plot of the story! Instead, choose a scene or series of related moments, describe them briefly (2-3 sentences) and explain how your selection contributes to or challenges issues raised in our discussion. Be specific: we’ve been talking about a lot of stuff! I expect you to use terminology we’ve been discussing in class, and to anchor your statements about class material by referencing the lectures, and/or the theoretical readings (by Gernsbeck, Wells, or the essay you’ve chosen for your Criticism response paper), and/or the other fiction and film we’ve discussed thus far.
Your response paper must be titled and accompanied by a Works Cited.
Below is some information about the stories in the folder:
C.L. Moore, “Shambleau” (1933): This is the first, and most famous, published story by Catherine Lucille Moore, who published as C.L. Moore to conceal her gender identity. First published in the pulp magazine Weird Tales (November 1933), this work is in the public domain.
Harlan Ellison, “‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman” (1965): one of the most celebrated sf stories, combining stylistic and technical innovation. Citation: Galaxy. December 1965.
Samuel R. Delany, “Aye, and Gomorrah…” (1967): Delany is Black, gay, and active in the counter-cultural movement of the 1960s. His work typically wields the conventions of sf to explore non-conventional identities. Citation: Delany, Samuel R. Driftglass. Signet: 1971.
Ursula K. Le Guin, “Nine Lives” (1969): First published in Playboy, under the initials U.K. Le Guin to conceal her gender identity, this story reflects on human evolution, posthumanity, and individual vs. collective consciousness. Citation: Evans, Arthur B., et al., eds. The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2020.
Joanna Russ, “When It Changed” (1972): Russ is a prominent figure in the feminist intervention into science fiction in the 1970s. This story describes a scene of first contact between genders. Citation: Ellison, Harlan, ed. Again: Dangerous Visions. Gateway Press, 1972.
William Gibson, “Burning Chrome” (1982): Gibson is an influential cyberpunk author and is generally credited with introducing the term “cyberspace” to contemporary usage. This story is a predecessor to his novel Neuromancer (1984), viewed as the most influential sf novel in the late 20th century.
Kate Wilhelm, “Forever Yours, Anna” (1987): Wilhelm, a practitioner of feminist SF, uses time-travel to reflect on domesticity and gender identity. Citation: Evans, Arthur B., et al., eds. The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2020.
Ted Chiang, “Exhalation” (2008): A meditation on life and survival for a race of mechanical beings by one of SF’s most creative and intriguing contemporary practitioners. Citation: Evans, Arthur B., et al., eds. The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2020.

Categories
Classic English literature

For this response paper, you should choose an essay to respond to from one of th

For this response paper, you should choose an essay to respond to from one of the attached files. I have tried to offer an historical range (1960s to 21st century) as well as a variety of perspectives.
Directions for Response Papers:
First, briefly summarize the point in the essay you plan to respond to. Carefully select and present only the most important and relevant ideas from the essay, the ones you wish to engage in dialogue with. You will not have the space to present an extensive summary! A summary means restating the author’s idea in your own words (not by simply stringing together a series of quotes or close paraphrases). This should take up the first 2-3 sentences of your paper.
Then, present your own original response to these key ideas and thesis: do you agree or disagree with the author’s claims? Why? This should take up the next 2-3 sentences of your paper, and is essentially your thesis.
Finally: Explain the reasoning that supports your own claims. Do not merely state what you think; explain why you think this and how your own ideas and claims challenge, extend, modify, or refute the author’s argument. Use examples from the primary texts we have read to support your claims. This last part of the assignment should take up the majority of your paper.
Your response paper must be titled and include a Works Cited.
Below is some information about the essays:
Carl Freedman, Critical Theory and Science Fiction (selection) (2000): revisits the sf/fantasy debate to reflect on the nature of science fiction and what distinguishes it from fantasy.
Joanna Russ, “The Aesthetics of Science Fiction” (1975): an influential argument that traditional literary criticism (designed for secular, humanistic works) is inappropriate for sf.
J.G. Ballard, “Which way to inner space?” (1962): a manifesto for the genre that helped inaugurate the “new wave” of 1960s sf: fiction characterized by creativity and experimentation.
Nalo Hopkinson, “Report from Planet Midnight” (2010): the text of an important speech on race in the science fiction and fantasy literary community.
Gwyneth Jones, “Aliens in the Fourth Dimension?” (1996): a reflection on how representations of aliens are linked to the dynamics of colonialism
Joanna Russ, “The Image of Women in Science Fiction” (1972): a severe criticism of the depiction of gender in sf of the time.
Bruce Sterling, Preface to Mirrorshades: The Cyberpunk Anthology (1986): introduces cyberpunk, a movement within sf that arose from the new technological realities of the 1980s.
Vernor Vinge, “The coming technological singularity: How to survive in a post-human era” (1993): a relatively sanguine reflection on human and machine coevolution.