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Artists collaborate to generate fresh ideas, build relationships, and widen thei

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Artists collaborate to generate fresh ideas, build relationships, and widen their perspectives. Select one artifact (song, play, painting, etc.) you found interesting from this chapter, and respond to one of the following prompts:
a. Describe how artists collaborated to produce the artifact.
b. Explain how the artists influenced each other’s work.
c .Examine how the artifact shows the artist’s expression of cultural beliefs and perceptions.
Your post should be a paragraph of at least 5–7 sentences to fully address the prompt. Then, respond to at least one classmate’s post with a unique idea or something that hasn’t been said.
2. below will be what I selected from the chapter to write on( song)
Discover the Con textMiles
Davis in Paris, France, 1964.Herve Glaoguen/Getty Images
Historical Context: In the world of jazz, 1959 was a monumental year. Three all-time classic albums were released—albums that influence American music to this day. Tracks like “Blue Rondo à la Turk” appeared on the album Time Out, in which the Dave Brubeck Quartet combined Turkish rhythms with the blues. And in The Shape of Jazz to Come, Ornette Coleman abandoned typical structure altogether. But the album with the most profound and lasting effect in jazz history is Kind of Blue by Miles Davis, which features the recording “Freddie Freeloader” that you just heard.In 1959, jazz music was continuing to evolve, and so was American society. The civil rights movement was well underway. African Americans across the nation, many of them college students, were ready and willing to protest against racial segregation in all contexts of American life. They conducted “sit-ins” with the goal of desegregating places such as department store lunch counters, libraries, theaters, museums, and other public facilities that were reserved for “Whites Only.” Like the changes that were gradually transforming the broader society, Kind of Blue ushered in a new era in jazz.The album opens with “Freddie Freeloader,” Miles Davis’s response to what he saw as the frantic, overly complex direction jazz had taken since the 1940s. Kind of Blue grew from his earlier experiments with “modal” jazz, in which simple “modes,” or musical scales, served as the background for the soloists’ melody.1 It is an album of musical meditation, mellow and understated, more concerned with atmosphere than fireworks, but it still swings and sounds undeniably like jazz. It has gradually become the top-selling jazz record of all time, and for many fans it’s the standard against which all other jazz albums are measured.Watch music instructor Jason DeCristofaro explain improvisation in the song “Freddie Freeloader.” Read Text Transcriipt Musical Context: “Freddie Freeloader” was the first tune recorded for the album Kind of Blue, and it is an excellent example of musical improvisation. Musicians improvise when they create ideas spontaneously, without planning what they’re going to play ahead of time. This spontaneous, loose feeling is exactly what Miles Davis wanted his band to capture. To do this, Davis famously gave them very little instruction at the recording session, mostly sketches and ideas, just enough so they could know the general shape of the piece. Then Davis trusted their expertise and gave them the freedom to do their own thing, or improvise.In order to improvise effectively in jazz, one of the structural elements musicians need to understand is a riff. A riff, put simply, is a musical idea that repeats. Riffs are usually short. In “Freddie Freeloader,” for example, Miles Davis plays a simple two-note riff on the trumpet. This short riff repeats over and over throughout the track. Note that the bass player and the drummer are not improvising, but rather helping to maintain the structure and to keep time for the other musicians.Watch music instructor Jason DeCristofaro explain how members of Miles Davis’s band support one another as they improvise in the song “Freddie Freeloader.” Read Text Transcriipt In addition to improvisation and riffs, another important structural element in jazz is call-and-response, which is like a musical conversation or group discussion. In “Freddie Freeloader,” the pianist listens for the riff, or call, and uses the space between the riffs to fill in the gaps with his response. Notice how every musician in the band listens to what everyone else is playing—no one plays over the others.With jazz legends such as Cannonball Adderley on alto saxophone, John Coltrane on tenor saxophone, Wynton Kelly on piano, Paul Chambers on bass, and Jimmy Cobb on drums, Miles Davis’s band had the freedom and the experience to create a masterpiece. These younger artists looked up to Davis for guidance and inspiration, while he looked to them for their talent and innovative musical ideas. One of Miles Davis’s greatest talents, in my opinion, was his ability to assemble a fantastic band and give them the right environment to play at their best. That their individual styles came together and resulted in one of the most influential albums of all time is a testament not only to their abilities, but to the power of group collaboration to produce something no individual could possibly have created alone.
3. Please for the discussion, 175 words and for response 125 words. WILL SEND PEER RESPONSE SHORTLY

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